Successful People Take Risks With Angie Lee

Successful People Take Risks With Angie Lee of the "Angie Lee Podcast".

Posted on September 23, 2020 by

Get ready to be F.I.R.E.D U.P! Because today we have Angie Lee. She is the host of the top-rated marketing podcasts, The Angie Lee Show. She shares her success story and how social media affects everyone, especially young women.

Check out my “F.I.R.E.D Up” playlist with more interviews!

Just visit —> http://bit.ly/3bmkm0o!

Click here to listen to this interview

Angie Lee:

Yay. Oh my gosh, it’s working now.

Speaker 2:

Hi there. Yeah, I’m not sure what happened. That’s so weird. I’m sorry.

Angie Lee:

Oh my gosh. I was like, “What is happening?”

Speaker 2:

How are you?

Angie Lee:

It was on a waiting screen, and it was just like … Oh my gosh, I was like …

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I don’t know why.

Angie Lee:

I’ve never done it like that, where someone has a pretty link for their Zoom. That was so cool.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And I need to make sure that it’s still working, so let me just do one thing here.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. Ooh, I like your phone backdrop.

Speaker 2:

Oh, thank you.

Angie Lee:

Oh, that is fun. I need to do that.

Speaker 2:

Let me ask Zach. ow you doing?

Angie Lee:

Good, good.

Speaker 2:

Great.

Angie Lee:

Hey, where do you live?

Speaker 2:

I live in Northern California.

Angie Lee:

Oh, cool. How northern?

Speaker 2:

I’m an hour from San Francisco.

Angie Lee:

Oh, wow. Super north. Okay.

Speaker 2:

Yep. Where are you at?

Angie Lee:

San Diego.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I love San Diego.

Angie Lee:

Oh, yeah. It’s chill. It’s fun.

Speaker 2:

I couldn’t find your intake form. I was looking anywhere for it. [crosstalk 00:01:28]-

Angie Lee:

I’m going to take a screenshot of what I …

Speaker 2:

Huh? Did you send it to Zach?

Angie Lee:

Oh, I’m going to show you the screen … Oh, can you hear me?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Can you hear me?

Angie Lee:

I’m going to take a … for after, I’ll show you … Let’s do it.

Speaker 2:

Hi, everyone. Are you ready to be fired up? Because I sure am. We have Angie Lee here. She is an amazing young woman, very young, and has done more than most people will do when they retire. So, she’s awesome into marketing, and I want you to sit back, listen. If you want to know about marketing, possibly podcasting and how you can promote yourself and your brand, this is a show you’re going to want to listen to. Just give me about 30 seconds and I’ll be right back.

Hi Angie. So happy to have you here. Thanks so much for being here. So, tell us about yourself. I am actually really intrigued because you are very young and you have achieved so much at such a young age, and so we can kind of talk about where you came from and where you’re at now, and I’m just going to hand it over to you.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. So, I started a wellness blog in college. I was 19 years old. Hated school. Was typical entrepreneur since diapers; lemonade stands, always knew that I wasn’t meant to fit in a box. And so instead of going to class, I created a blog and I started creating content and putting myself out there. And obviously over time, what happened is it builds a community. Now, my intention was never to really monetize it until about two years in, and I made my first $60 on an ebook, and I was like, “Oh my gosh, this is incredible. The internet is where it’s at. I don’t even know this person and they just paid me $60. Holy crap. I’m set for life.” I was 20 years old, so a hundred bucks online, 60 bucks online, you’re like, “Mom, I made it. I’m done. I’m a millionaire.” Whatever. You know, “You can retire now, Mom.”

So, I then realized the power of digital marketing. I became obsessed with digital marketing around 21, 22 years old. I stayed up till 4:00 AM most nights studying basically all of these trainings for free on YouTube at the time when I was broke. Right? So, I basically studied digital marketing. How do you make money online? How do you take this thing called a brand and actually get people to buy products and services? So, went into courses, was doing health coaching online. That transitioned into then the podcast and teaching other women marketing. And then now it’s transitioned into fully podcasting influencer affiliate marketers. So now, my job is to promote other brands and products and services and really cool stuff I love, but it’s been a crazy … gosh, 11 years now. I just turned 30, so it’s been a lot of-

Speaker 2:

You don’t look 30. You look about … I think the older I get, the younger people look. I just turned 49.

Angie Lee:

Yay!

Speaker 2:

I’m like, oh God, I want to be 30 again.

Angie Lee:

Yay! Okay. I’m like … Well, I feel like I’m an old soul, but I also act like I’m 12 because I love poop jokes. So I’m I’m a weird mix of 90 and also 25 hopefully, but …

Speaker 2:

Did you say you like poop jokes?

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I live for them.

Speaker 2:

Oh my God. So, this is … I’ll just tell you a funny joke. So, okay. This book right here, right? The Ultimate Digital Marketing Playbook. So basically, if I would have showed you … I wanted it to be a poop emoji because … and I don’t even remember what the reasoning. So I had this poop emoji and I had this done on Fiverr and I was so excited, and my marketing team is like, “We are never going to promote that book.” I’m like, “Why? Don’t you guys love it? It’s like a poop emoji and we can have poop pillows and we can have poop this and that, and poop things for the car,” and they were like, “No.”

Angie Lee:

They were like, “No”

Speaker 2:

If I can ever find that, I’ll have to send it to you, because you’ll laugh.

Angie Lee:

That’s so great. I love that. Yeah. I call my tribe the baby grandmas. We’re old souls and young bodies, and I grew up fast. I was a gymnast training 40 hours a week. I dropped out of college. I dropped out of corporate. I was a hundred thousand dollars in debt when I started this. I didn’t know what I was doing. I just started putting myself out there. I just started creating content, and what happened over the years is people started to say, “Wow, this was helpful. Wow, I love this. Wow. How do I do X, Y and Z? How do I learn from you?” And so, gosh, anything you stay consistent with for long enough becomes incredible. Right? And I truly believe that, and so now here I am speaking, podcasting. I own a CBD line with my brother. I kind of have my hands in a few different things. So, that’s me in a few minutes.

Speaker 2:

Let’s talk a little bit about … I love what you said about if you do something long enough and you stick to it, eventually it’ll work. Right?

Angie Lee:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So, you’re 30 years old. You have your own podcast, the Angie Lee show. Correct?

Angie Lee:

Yep.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so the Angie Lee show. And how many listeners do you have? How many downloads do you have a month on that?

Angie Lee:

Oh gosh, we’re probably at half a million now. 400,000 to 500,000 a month. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Wow. So 400,000 to 500,000 listeners a month, which is amazing. How long have you had the podcast?

Angie Lee:

Four and a half years. Almost five.

Speaker 2:

Four and a half years. So tell us a little bit about the journey on that, because you said something really smart; that anything you do long enough … and I think some people will just look somebody and think that, oh, they have it so easy and they just were an overnight success, and all of a sudden here is Angie and she’s 30 years old and she’s just doing so well. Talk about your journey and how that kind of looked.

Angie Lee:

Yeah, it’s interesting. This is probably my favorite thing to chat about now because I think one of the biggest fallacies in success is that it was easy for someone or it just happened overnight. Right? And the book I’m writing right now that’s coming out in the new year is called Ready Is a Lie. And it’s essentially about this concept of everyone started at day one. Everyone started as a beginner. Nobody knew what they were doing. You have to suck before you’re successful. And it’s interesting. After interviewing so many successful people and going through my journey, this is what I realized is the secret. I’m like, yeah, it’s drive, it’s determination, it’s grit. It’s all these corny things you see in the personal development world over and over. But I was like, no, that’s not it. I think the number one thing is people who are successful started before they’re ready. Amen, end of story. That’s just what they did. They didn’t have all of the answers. They didn’t know what they’re doing.

So I think for me, a lot of my journey has been throwing shit at the wall and seeing if it will stick. Right? So seeing, hey, am I good at podcasting? Can I do this? I didn’t know anything about tech and audio but I said, “You know what? I can scrape together 30, 40 bucks, pay some guy on Craigslist to help me figure it out,” and now I have a top rated show. So it just started with me being gritty and saying, “Can I just start where I’m at and figure it out?” Right? Live events. I host one of the largest female personal development events, and I didn’t know what I was doing [crosstalk 00:07:24]-

Speaker 2:

What’s the name of the event that you do?

Angie Lee:

Pays To Be Brave.

Speaker 2:

Pays To Be Brave, gosh, great.

Angie Lee:

Pays To Be Brave. So, it’s interesting because even before Pays To Be Brave, I realized I didn’t know anything about event planning. I didn’t even know what an event planner really did. I didn’t know how much events cost. I didn’t know the stress they would be. I didn’t know anything about events. I just said, “You know what? This would be a really fun experience. Let me try this out. I want to do this for my community.” So, every single thing I’ve done, I’ve never … Every single thing I’ve done hasn’t really had a clear plan. It’s just been me putting myself out there, failing embracing the suck, learning from it, and then I get back up again.

Same thing with CBD. My brother and I have a DTC line. We put $60,000 in, turned it into a multiple seven figure brand. Had no idea what we were doing. We’re still not experts in cannabis, but we were passionate. And we said, “You know what? People need this. People need to get out of pain.” And so I feel like all of my stories are not knowing shit, and then just figuring it out along the way. Right? And I think that’s the unsexy secret that people don’t want to hear, but there is no one way to it. You know?

Speaker 2:

I always say stop being ready, stop aiming, just fire. Fire first, and then get ready and aim later on. So many people are always getting ready and they’re aiming and they want it to be so perfect that they never ever fire. And so I like that you said you just go for it, because that’s … And I think that people that are really successful, they take way more risks. They fail so much more, so they have more chances at being successful because they take more risks than most people. You know?

Angie Lee:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

You’re a good example. You’re saying, “Hey, we have a CBD line that’s doing really well, and podcasting.” You’ve got the speaking engagements. That’s a lot going on for anybody.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I mean, I’ve put the event on hold right now because obviously with corona, I had to, and then really taking that off my plate so I can bring the book in. So I’m very intentional when I do bring projects on, and I don’t do everything at once. I do it in chunks, right? And I take one thing at a time and I don’t try to do five things at once. I think that’s where people get really overwhelmed as female entrepreneurs and male entrepreneurs. They’re just like, “I want to do all of these things.” And it’s like, “I didn’t do all of them at once. I’m slowly adding them on.”

Speaker 2:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Mm-hmm (affirmative). So, tell us a little bit about your book.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. So, Ready Is a Lie is very similar to the concept of ready, fire, aim. [crosstalk 00:09:38]-

Speaker 2:

What a great title. Ready Is a Lie. I love that. Love that.

Angie Lee:

I love it so much. It came to me when I was in the car, gosh, a year ago. My boyfriend literally had to stop the car. He was like, “That is literally …” He does book marketing, and he’s like, “That’s literally one of the best titles I’ve heard, and I’ve helped some of the best books in the world.” And I was like, “I have to do this. I have to do this.” So as much as it’s a pain in the ass right now to write a book, like, it’s not fun. I don’t know if I’ll do it again.

Speaker 2:

It’s a lot of work. Writing a book is definitely a lot of work. It’s like, oh my gosh, when you think you’re done, you have six months more to go. You know?

Angie Lee:

Yeah. And I’m having fun with it because I have a good team. I have a co-writer who’s helping, so I have all the support you possibly could have, but yet I’m like, oh my gosh, this thing is a beast. This is an animal. This is like a child. So, yeah. Ready Is a Lie is essentially about this concept of starting before you have all the answers, being willing to suck, embracing the suck, just really encouraging ambitious, hungry women to do it. Whether it’s leaving the good relationship for the great relationship, going and asking your boss for a raise. This isn’t just for the entrepreneurial woman. Whether it’s starting your health and wellness routine that you need to do to take care of yourself. It’s essentially the ultimate book to kick you in the pants and say, “What are you waiting for?’ And that’s what this [crosstalk 00:10:48]-

Speaker 2:

You, I can tell, are such a great role model for young women. They need somebody that they can look up to that has been successful and done it, and that has got a good head on their shoulders, and just to inspire them and lead them. So, kudos to you.

Angie Lee:

Aw, that’s so sweet. Because I feel like I want to hit more younger women. I like hitting women 30 and up. I think it’s fun, but there’s something about the 20 year old girl that I’m like, man, I just feel her because I remember being there. I remember being 20 years old and feeling so lost and weird, and why did I feel different than everybody else? Why didn’t I want to go to corporate, right? And so I remember feeling lost, and I wish there was someone who could tell me it’s okay to be weird. It’s okay to be different.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Gosh, young women. I have two daughters.

Angie Lee:

Aww.

Speaker 2:

I have a 19 year old and almost a 21 year old October 10th, and man, they need people like you more than you even know. Because obviously I can’t tell my daughters anything because I’m their mom, but to have them have a role model who’s … Right at your age is a perfect age for that, for actually women that are 40, 50, my age, but even a little bit younger, because so many of them have entrepreneurial mindsets and it’s just different the way that people are being pushed now. I wouldn’t put that age group out at all, because I think that it would be amazing for you, just kind of throwing it out there. There’s not a lot of people that are inspirational and encouraging for the younger person. You know?

Angie Lee:

Yeah, I love that. And I feel like there’s not a lot of resources for them. Right? They go to school and college is teaching them, get a degree, go get a job, get your 401k and live a great life, and then you die. That’s literally what college is about. And I remember being like-

Speaker 2:

Safety.

Angie Lee:

… “This can’t be it.” Yeah, it’s just about safety. And it’s about making $40,000 a year and working 80 hours a week. No, thank you. And so I just remember being like, “Is this the only way? This cannot be the only way. This cannot be the only option.” And so I started studying mentors like Gary Vaynerchuk and seeing that people were taking their brands and monetizing them online and making a business with it. And I made the choice to quit college. I went in, I told my counselor, “See you never,” and now I’m here.

Speaker 2:

See you never. I love it.

Angie Lee:

See you never, because I hated school.

Speaker 2:

Goodbye.

Angie Lee:

It’s like, I can’t wait to have my kids not go to school, because I’m just going to be like, “Go do something else. It’s such a waste of money.”

Speaker 2:

I hate to even … Even knowing what I know now, I mean, I’m sure I’m going to make a lot of my listeners mad, but I apologize, but it’s true. I mean, even with my daughters, I want to encourage them to go to school, but I just teacher … They don’t really learn anything when they’re in school. What they learn is how to stick to something, but they don’t really learn how to be an entrepreneur or how to actually do that thing that they’re wanting to do. And the amount of people that actually go and do what they went to college for is like zero. And then they usually find out that they hate it when they actually get there many times. You know? So talk to us a little bit about your podcast. I know you’re monetizing it now, so tell us a bit about that process.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. Podcasting is an interesting job because I remember when I started, I had no idea how people actually made money podcasting. Similar to TV, I’m going to break this down for the listeners, it’s no different. Companies are buying ad space, right? So a lot of times, the way that podcasters monetize their show is, well, first they promote their own programs and services. So initially that’s what I did in the beginning; my own coaching, my own products. And now I use it as a vehicle to be the resource in itself that I’m paid to do. So in the beginning, I used it more as a funnel to go to my own courses and programs. And now, I’m paid for the show, per show by brands. So they’ll pay for a 30 or 60 second spot. And then sometimes additionally, we’ll do affiliate cuts where based on the number of products that I sell, I get a certain cut.

So for me, my vision is to really just keep doubling down on that. I mean, it’s a beautiful job. It’s very energy rich because you have to give out a lot of energy. I always say it’s not a very time intensive job. It can be 10, 15 hours a week, but it’s an intense 10, 15 hours. The energy that is required to pump people up all the time is a lot. So that’s why I’m obsessed with taking care of myself because I’m like, oh my gosh, this is a lot.

Speaker 2:

It’s true, and people need that source of energy. I just did a two-day event with people in my coaching program, and I was beat. It was only nine to five, Thursday and Friday, but I mean, at the end of the day on Friday, I felt like I got hit by a Mack truck. Especially even being on Zoom, a virtual event, you have to be even more energetic and entertaining because your people are on the other side and they’re sitting there on a computer all day, and there’s no interaction. They can fall asleep. So you’re just like, aah. You know? They’re like, “Oh my God.” I see people yawning, I’m like, “Are you literally yawning right now? How can you yawn with me on the other end? C’mon, wake up.” And they’re just like, [crosstalk 00:15:18]

Angie Lee:

Yeah. You’re like, “Wake up.”

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. So, good.

Angie Lee:

[crosstalk 00:15:23]

Speaker 2:

So, your podcast. You’re being paid then to have people advertise on there as well as affiliates. Great, and only four and a half years. That is really inspiring.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I mean, I feel like that’s a long time, but maybe I’m … I don’t know. It is and it’s not, right? It’s actually not really, if you really think about it.

Speaker 2:

Not to have that many followers, number one, that many subscribers every single month. That’s insane. I mean, the fact that you’re able to monetize it to the point where that’s your full-time job now mostly, correct?

Angie Lee:

Yeah, and then CBD. I mean, I own a wellness brand, but other than that, yeah. I mean, that’s been my focus. I don’t like coaching. I always wanted to phase out of coaching. I don’t want to be a coach online. I think that’s right now … It’s just not my personality type. I think I did it for so long because it’s such a big world right now and it’s super profitable, but I was super miserable when I was doing it. And I was like, I just want to be paid to be me. I don’t want to coach people.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. That’s great. Good for you. Okay. So, the CBD line. So, CBD, there’s no THC.

Angie Lee:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

It’s just CBD. So it’s the non get you kind of funky feeling type part of the plant. Right? But it has a ton of medicinal benefits to it.

Angie Lee:

Yes. Yeah. So, we have gummies. We have … Gosh, I have some over here. We have tinctures. We’ve got everything.

Speaker 2:

What’s the name of your brand?

Angie Lee:

Soul. Soul CBD.

Speaker 2:

I love that, Soul. My gosh, I know the CBD industry is supposed to be a something multi-billion, trillion dollar business in the next six years.

Angie Lee:

Probably. It’s a huge world. We’re probably going to get out soon, but it’s been fun. It’s been fun building a business with my brother and doing that. But yeah, I’ve been using CBD for anxiety for years. He used it as an athlete for pain, and we came together and said, “Let’s help people. Let’s create something that can really get people out of pain that’s not a pharmaceutical.” I’m really, really against the pharma industry. I think, gosh, it’s another episode for another time, but it’s done a lot more harm than good, I think, most of the time. So I was like, hey, if I was to do a wellness product, it would be something that helps people get out of pain, helps them sleep, helps them with their anxiety, and isn’t harmful. There’s no side effect. There’s no toxicity to CBD. I could literally eat all of these and nothing will happen as far as a psychoactive or a toxicity level. It’s the most incredible plant in the world, one of them. So yeah, we’ve been having fun with it. It’s been fun.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So, Soul. Soul CBD. If you’re into finding out about how to help yourself. So, anxiety, that’s a good one. A lot of people have anxiety. I think a lot of people are just ridden with anxiety. I think especially our younger generation, based upon social media and their phones and Instagram, and they just can see everything at the other end of them all the time. And you know how they should be calling Facebook Fakebook, right? And so when you are young, all you see is these … everyone’s amazing life, and these TikTok videos, and how everything just seems so perfect. And these poor young youth, they think that everyone else is just living this amazing life. So the anxiety that younger kids have is really, really astronomical. You should do a teenager line, like a teen line for CBD.

Angie Lee:

Oh, yeah. Yeah, now you’re making me want to talk to teenagers. I’m like, [crosstalk 00:18:09]-

Speaker 2:

I know. I have a passion for teenagers. I just do. I don’t know. I love kids, so for me, it’s like … And when you work with them, you realize how bad they need help. They just need … And also too with this … I’m sorry I’m getting on this tangent. I just apologize.

Angie Lee:

[crosstalk 00:18:23]

Speaker 2:

But with these young kids now, it’s like they see all of these … Everyone has this … The world is just supposed to be so, you can do whatever you want. And so the morals and the values just keep getting chipped away even more and more, and the level of sex that they’re having, and so much drugs. You would not believe the kind of things that I hear around being around my daughters. And it’s just like, wow. And that’s just how they’re … “That’s how it is, Mom. That’s how it is.” It’s like, it doesn’t mean that it’s right. You know?

Angie Lee:

Yeah. It’s so sexualized. Everything is now. It’s so messed up and I’m just like, what is happening? My kids hopefully will never deal … Well, they’re going to deal with this. And I’m just going to be like, “Oh God.”

Speaker 2:

Move somewhere far. Whatever you do, move somewhere very, very far.

Angie Lee:

I know, right?

Speaker 2:

Okay. Okay. I know this is a question that is … Everyone asks this question. Really, there’s no one-sided answer, but you kind of already answered it as far as, you interview a lot of entrepreneurs. Correct?

Angie Lee:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Okay. And so what would you say, and you kind of already said it, but aside from just being the fact that they just go for it, they start before they’re ready, they don’t just ready and aim, they actually fire and they fail a lot, what else would you say is something that people that want to be successful that are maybe sitting here listening to this right now and they want to start something new or they’re sick and tired of sitting at that nine to five job, and they realize that they’re building somebody else’s dreams and not their own, but they feel like they’re stuck, they feel they really can’t do anything, what would your advice be to them?

Angie Lee:

Yeah. How old is this person?

Speaker 2:

Any age. Any age at all. Let’s just say they’re 30 and above.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I think of course ready is a lie. Right? I mean, I really do think that it’s … I think the most successful people in the world just started. They just started, they took baby steps. But I do think they also have, yes, a healthy relationship with failure, but I believe it also takes a healthy relationship with criticism, feedback. Right? And knowing that a life of bravery and a life of putting yourself out there or starting a business or whatever brave thing you’re doing in your career, you’re going to get negative feedback. You’re going to get people who don’t like it. Right? So, I think that’s been one of the hardest parts of my journey, and I think especially young people need to hear is, that’s okay if not everybody loves what you’re doing. It’s not their life. Right? It’s not their life; it’s yours. And so that was something I had to learn at a really young age, because I was putting myself out there at 19 years old and getting trolls on the internet. Right? So I think back [crosstalk 00:20:47]-

Speaker 2:

And back when you did it, 19 years ago, it was super new back then. I mean even, the fact that you had your podcast four and a half years ago, it didn’t really start becoming super popular until probably the past two years. You know? It was much more popular. So you kind of were a little bit early adopter to both social media and the internet and the marketing world digitally.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. It wasn’t as … I mean, now it’s like, ugh. I mean, now everyone’s just so sensitive and everything is so sexualized, but I think back then it was not as bad. It was definitely a little bit better.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Angie Lee:

Now I’m like, screw the internet. This is my job, but I’m also like, what happening to the internet?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah. Do you find yourself more of a consumer of social media or more of a producer?

Angie Lee:

Oh, God. I mean, I’m a producer, that’s my job, but I definitely still consume it to see the trends, to see what’s relevant, but I pretty much mute everyone’s stories, everyone’s feed. I don’t see anything. So I’m just in the zone trying to create my own shit. I don’t like to … If I do, I start to get into comparison. You know? Like, oh, I need that. I need her life. I mean, everyone feels that way. You could have a great, happy life and still feel like, wow, I need her life. She looks like she has everything. And so I noticed that’s just so dangerous, especially for young women to see that. Like you said, your daughters. To think that your daughters are like, “Oh, Mom I need to look lik this.” And they’re seeing these influencers in LA who it’s photoshopped, which is fine, but it’s photoshopped and they don’t realize it is. You know? And so then they’re wondering-

Speaker 2:

Are all those pictures photoshopped, really? Because I’m like, how do those girls … [crosstalk 00:22:13]

Angie Lee:

That’s not her waist, that’s not her skin, that’s not her boobs. And that’s okay, but maybe you should tell young girls, because then they’re confused and they want to get plastic surgery at 15, and it’s a little young to be upset about how you look.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Angie Lee:

It’s a weird world now. It’s so weird. I can’t imagine having kids right now through this. God bless you. I don’t even know what mine are going to experience. Let’s say even I started now. In 20 years, what’s the world going to be like? You know?

Speaker 2:

I think it’s going to get better. So I’m actually [crosstalk 00:22:38]-

Angie Lee:

Yeah, I hope so.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I’m feeling like it’s gotten so crazy that it only can get better, like more traditional. My girls will even say, “Mom, I wish that I didn’t have to know what it’s like to have a cell phone and know what everyone …” They say that. I actually have this program that I do, it’s called Teens Lifting Lives. And one of the things that we do is one day a week, they aren’t allowed to have phone or social media, for one day a week during the entire eight week timeframe. And then one hour a day, and every kid will admit to the fact that they liked not … They’re like, “Don’t tell my parents, but I actually liked not having my phone. I got more done. I didn’t have as much anxiety.” They will say that.

Angie Lee:

Wow.

Speaker 2:

I just can’t imagine being … I mean, even as adults, think about what we see. People are like, “Oh, the best marriage ever, the best life ever,” then you see them fighting over the cat in the divorce court. You know? It’s like, “Oh, I thought you guys were so happy. All your pictures you sent.” It’s just not life.

Angie Lee:

All your pictures. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

You know? Yeah, your pictures and your video. Like, they sure were good at faking. I didn’t even know.

Angie Lee:

Yeah, and then everyone’s judging everyone’s lives too, which I’m so just … Ugh, this putting people on a pedestal and cyber bullying. It’s just like, let people live.

Speaker 2:

And everyone has problems. I think it’s so important too. So, let’s talk about that a little bit. I think this is really important. I try to talk to people about just being real and being vulnerable, and people are really afraid to show that weakness, right? They’re afraid to … Somebody of you, position of power and authority figure, and influencer, a leader. A lot of times, people are afraid to … I mean, my own team has actually chastised me for being too real. Right? Like, “You shouldn’t tell people that.” And I’m just like, “Well, why?” And they’re like, “Because you’re supposed to be this.” I’m like, “I am. Well, I’m just human like them.” So, what do you feel about that? I mean, do people get to see the real Angie?

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I mean, I think the only reason I have the brand I do is because I’m so real. And that sounds weird to say, like I’m real. What does that even mean? But I don’t pretend to be someone I’m not. I’m not super, like … I don’t know. I think a lot of these female influencers right now are trying to show a perfect life, and they’re so afraid to show that maybe they have anxiety that day. You have a zit. You have a fight. I don’t know. There’s one thing where I don’t think you should air your dirty laundry on social 24/7 and be negative Nancy.

Speaker 2:

No.

Angie Lee:

I think that’s obviously not okay. But I think showing people, hey, I don’t have it all figured out. I’m just like you; I’m just a few steps ahead. I call it aspirational attainability. So I think that’s what I’ve really mastered with my brand is women feel they look up to me, but I’m also their best friend. And I think if you can nail that, it’s kind of game over because you’re just being honest. You’re like, “Hey, I know some shit, but I also don’t know some shit.” And I think that is what a lot of these … Gosh, I mean, I lived in LA for a bit and I’m just using it as an example, but it’s these perfect husbands and perfect kids and perfect lives, and they’re rich and they’re pretty and they’re all ripped, and they just have no problems and their feed is perfect. And I’m just like, ew, puke, who wants to see that anymore?

And most people don’t. I’ve surveyed my audience. They’re like, “Dude, I love that your feed’s not perfectly cohesive.” If it is, it means how do you have that much time on your hands? I thought that woman was a mom with four kids. How is your feed … It just doesn’t make sense. And so I think even moms should be … I can’t wait to share that part of my journey when it happens, but I think moms should even be showing more of, what does it really look like to be a mom and be working? Because I know as a 30 year old woman, it’s weird for me to see these moms being like, “Life’s perfect, yay, and I just make a million dollars and I have four kids and we just figure it all out.” It’s like, no, you have three nannies. Just tell me you have three nannies when I know, so then I don’t feel a piece of crap when I have to hire nannies one day, because I was following Susan who I thought was my idol because she could do it too. So, it’s confusing. It’s all so confusing on the internet, you know?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, keep being you.

Angie Lee:

Yes, keep it as real as possible.

Speaker 2:

Well, you can tell right away that you’re pretty real, and that’s what’s so attractive about you is that you’re just you, which so many people want to see that. And so many people need to see that now because they do see so much just fakeness out there. I need to actually try to start doing a little more social media when I actually am dressed up. I’m constantly in my sweat outfit, on my bike, I look totally hot mess.

Angie Lee:

I love it.

Speaker 2:

[crosstalk 00:26:30] ever shower? I’m like, well, sometimes.

Angie Lee:

You’re like, Tuesdays. On Tuesdays.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Well, COVID, you know? I do shower. But it’s like, I’m doing this crazy challenge right now. You can only … Anyways, I’m no getting into it, but sometimes I’m like, I need to get ready for once so at least it looks like I do make up once in a while. You know?

Angie Lee:

Yeah, like put it … yeah, [crosstalk 00:26:46].

Speaker 2:

Yeah, God forbid. Well, gosh, it’s been really, really great talking to you. I’m really super excited for your success, and I love the name of the book and that you’re doing it. I mean, people are going to be so gravitated toward … When does it come out?

Angie Lee:

Hopefully in January.

Speaker 2:

Good for you. Good for you.

Angie Lee:

We’ll see.

Speaker 2:

And your listeners are going to be so great to help you get the word out and get that thing going.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I think you just gave me a good reminder today that I’m writing the book for … Yes, women 30 and up are going to love it. I have a lot of followers in their 40s who love my stuff and my content and it’s helpful. But I think more than anything, that 21, 22 year old girl who’s just lost. And she’s like, “I’m ambitious, I’m hungry. I want more, but what else?” You know? And just wants to be brave. I think that woman-

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I hope I didn’t just give you a new whole thing to do, but I mean-

Angie Lee:

No, I mean, that’s sort of who I was writing it for, but when I hear that, it solidified it and reminds me that it’s important. And I think, oh, I’m too old for her now. It’s like, no, she wants someone who is five to 10 years older. So it’s old enough to be your big sister, but not so old that you’re almost her mom.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I think it’s … Well, that’s the thing, too. For me, I think I’m too old for … I’m 49. So most people around that are, ah, she’s so old. Where someone like you, you’ve done it all, you’re successful, you’re real, you’re entrepreneurial mindset, you’ve done what they want to do, and you’re normal. So that’s part of the best part about it. I think they need that. And to know they don’t have to be such … conform to everything and just what they’ve been … I mean, God, please, just teach them to respect their bodies more, to respect … Just because everyone’s doing it, it doesn’t mean everyone needs to do it. You know? I mean, it’s just unbelievable, the things that I hear about from … Hope I’m not going to get yelled at from my kids from this podcast. I think [inaudible 00:28:26] I might be in trouble, so [inaudible 00:28:27]. Delete from the kids bank. But no, I really appreciate that. I think that you would do phenomenal with that. You don’t even need any more money or more listeners. You got plenty, but maybe it’s just like, hey, every Wednesday is going to be for girls under 30 or something.

Angie Lee:

Yeah. I just got an idea. Yeah, okay. I’m like, this is good. This is good.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. One day. And plus that’d be a fun one, too. Bring in your … Because you lived that that era. You know what it’s to have social media and to have it consume you and to be a millennial. That’s you, right? I have no idea what it’s like. And for people to be as successful as you are at your age, that’s not very common at your age. So I think you’d have a massive great target audience. You might even really get some great sponsors and everything. Anyways, I’m going on a tangent, but Angie, it has been amazing to have you.

Angie Lee:

Aw, thank you.

Speaker 2:

So please just wrap up one more time where people can can find you, more about your book, just so they can learn about it in January. And of course I’ll put it in the show notes and all that great stuff as well.

Angie Lee:

Yay. You guys can go to angielee.com. That’s kind of where all my resources are. And then on Instagram, I’m @angieleeshow, and then on podcasts, any app you have for podcasts, it’s Angie Lee Show. So, pretty easy.

Speaker 2:

Great. And the book is coming out in January.

Angie Lee:

Yeah, mm-hmm (affirmative). Ready Is a Lie.

Speaker 2:

Yes. You guys nailed that one. Nailed it. The name of the book is huge. Great job. Okay, Angie, I appreciate your time.

Angie Lee:

[crosstalk 00:29:46]

Speaker 2:

I appreciate you being here and we’re super excited. I cannot wait to air this. You’re gorgeous both inside and out, and thank you as busy as you are for taking the time to be on our podcast.

Angie Lee:

Aw, thank you. I appreciate it.

Speaker 2:

Okay. I hope you’re just as fired up as I am. Now, here’s the deal. Go and check her out. She is awesome. If you’ve got young daughters or even young men should listen to this kind of a show as well. Get them on her podcast. Thanks so much for listening, and your time is still valuable, and I appreciate you spending just a small piece of it with me and with Angie. Have a great day, everybody.

For more of my interviews just visit https://kristamashore.com/category/interviews/

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